Chameleon Pens & Storage

Hi Everyone!

So, I showed you guys a video with the Color Keeper a while back and I demonstrated that the Chameleon Pens were too long to fit in it. This is my new storage for them. 🙂

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I also have a few thoughts on Chameleons vs. Copics. There is a learning curve. They take about the same amount of time to use as if you were blending with Copics. I like them because I figure I can have ten different colors in one pen and carry less. They are extremely long and hard to find storage and travel solutions for (if you don’t like the box they come in). You will need a lot more mixing toner refills (since each individual pen has it in the end piece for ease of use). But if you think about it, you’d have to buy the colors a lot for the Copics and it would even out. There are about 52 markers that make about 500 colors as opposed to having 138 (or however many there are now) of the Copics that JUST do those colors. I don’t want to have to juggle 5 to 10 markers to do one drawing when two of the Chameleon Pens will do. The Chameleon Pens, you have to hold them upright to avoid streaks through your artwork but don’t have to do that with Copics as far as I know. Not a con for me since I end up doing that naturally the longer I write, draw, or color. They don’t have empties that you can mix your own color, for sale to the general public yet. (They did a kickstarter for the new colors and that was a perk.) I like the blendability, less is more approach and haven’t picked up my Copics since I got the Chameleons. You do need to test to make sure it is the tone you want every time you “charge” it (or whatever they call it when you use the mixing chamber to lighten it). So you’ll want an extra piece of paper handy for your little scribbles. If you forget and leave it fused that’s a pretty big problem (since your mixing chamber won’t be clear any more and the pen will be much lighter). And you kind of need to plan out what you’ll do since it takes time to fuse each pen before you use it. Bonus: you have time to do that while you fuse. You can get some pretty cool effects going over one pen blend with another or merging them at the lightest point on a drawing.

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I loved blending them and I had watched their how to videos on fusing and stuff before they even got to the house. So, I was thrilled with the results right out of the box, but I had only done smaller areas. When I got to do some larger areas it became streaky and I couldn’t figure out why. So I finally saw in the newsletter (they email me every month) “how to avoid streaks” or something like that. You have to hold it upright and go a bit slowly. So, ever since then I have done great with them. I ran out of the fuse solution in a few of them but I hope to get a refill soon. I think I worked with them for about a month off and on before I tried a larger area and I’m kind of like a tiger when I want to learn something. So I kept stalking their website and any YouTube videos that had them in it, until I figured it out… idk how long it took me to find the tips and tricks. But it is like retraining your hand on how to hold a calligraphy pen. I still sometimes catch myself trying to color at a 45 degree angle instead of 90. I pretty much liked them straight out of the box. Like all alcohol pens and markers, they bleed through the paper and have an alcohol smell. So, I was prepared for that. If you’ve used Copics before – all you need to remember is how long to fuse it for how long you’ll blend it for (how much of the drawing you want to be light or if you want it to go darker much quicker) and to keep your pen at a 90 degree angle from the paper, and go SLOWLY (to make sure the colors blend and soak into each other).

I hope this video was helpful and informative for you.

Thanks for stopping by!

Audra aka Empress Syren

PS- As always, I am not paid by anyone to do reviews or to demo any products. My opinions are my own.

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